Foursquare Where? Whatever Happened to Geolocation?

Follow Us

  • RSS Feed
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google+

It caught fire across the globe. Brands in Europe had huge success stories using geolocation campaigns. Israel loved it. Africa dug it. South America even got in on the act. But for some reason, U.S. social media users and consumers never really warmed up to social media geolocation. Now a recent study has everybody wondering why nobody in the States wants to play Foursquare.

The PEW Internet and American Life Project released a survey last week which found that most Americans aren’t terribly thrilled in sharing thereabouts with their friends on social media.

“Americans are not currently all that eager to share explicitly their location on social media sites,” said Kathryn Zickuhr, co-author of the report. Twenty-three percent of Americans do use geolocation applications to find movies or get dining or shopping recommendations, but apparently the fascination ends there: Only 4 percent of Americans surveyed use their phones to share their locations via check-ins. So what gives?

We’re no experts here, but perhaps check-in fever just peaked too soon. Brands hopped all over Godwalla and Foursquare when they first appeared on the scene, and by the time Facebook Places showed up, the whole platform seemed exhausted. While Nike and Coca-Cola continue to have successful and edgy location-based campaigns overseas, America could care less. Experts speculate that the disinterest could in fact be part of a larger social media burn out.

But let’s hear from you, our smarty pants readers. Why hasn’t the U.S. taken to social location services? Tell us where it’s at in the comments section below!

5 Things You Might Have Missed

Follow Us

  • RSS Feed
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google+

So many crazy, informative, strange, stories— so little time. Thankfully we’ve hand picked a bushel of the best things happening right now in online marketing, social media and branding.

1.) Your What Talks?!?: We’ll gracefully avoid making any “douchey” jokes and let the outspoken lady parts in this series of online ads for Summer’s Eve do the talking, instead. These frank spots for feminine hygiene branded with the tagline “Hail to the V” are either groundbreaking or highly stereotypical and offensive. Either way, it’s a totally talked about and list-worthy campaign.

2.) Twittering Presidential Wannabes: When the GOP presidential hopefuls took to Twitter to debate the issues on Wednesday, there were three things that stood out: A.) Twitter as a political debate platform certainly has its limitations. B.) In order for people to care about Twitter campaigns, they need to be properly promoted, and C.) Obama and his social media marketing have this whole thing in the bag.

3.) The Big Apple Handpicked by New Yorkers: MyBlockNYC.com is an awesome new crowsourced site which allows New Yorkers to give virtual visitors a real look at the city that never sleeps. The site is a creative and social look at tourism from the people who live in New York. And it’s a trend we hope spreads to other cities.

4.) Plus or Minus: This great editorial from the thoughtful folks at good made us think about who we want to add as our Google+ friends. Google+ has had an estimated 18 million visitors so far and the way we friend — and market — on the site is bound to be a topic we continue to discuss.

5.) Rocking the Brostache: Okay, we know this is a few weeks old, but if you don’t watch Hulu as much as we do you might have missed the hilarity of Gieco’s new commercial and accompanying “brostache” smartphone app. It’s the kind of funny digital and mobile marketing folks love from Geico and far be it from us to dispute the power of a virtual moustache.

Five Things You Might Have Missed

Follow Us

  • RSS Feed
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google+

One is the loneliest number that you’ll ever do, so we’ve come up with five nifty stories from the world of social media, marketing and branding to keep you company.

1.) Picking up Chicks: Orange, the UK’s coolest tech and mobile company, ran an interactive campaign last week called Predict-a-Chick. In the good-natured guessing game, visitors to the site were encouraged to predict which numbered egg would hatch first or guess the heaviest chick. Winners got prizes, lovers of fuzzy cute things got to ooh and ahh and Orange scored some major traffic to its site. Well done!

2.) One Bad Apple: Thanks to i09 for pointing out these ridiculous Snow White apple snacks from Disney. Talk about a treat to avoid. Jeez. What’s next? Bambi burgers? Sleeping Beauty sewing kits? On the other hand, those could be a great snack for kids desperately in need of a nap.

3.) Bigotry, Made in the USA: In another “so glad I don’t have to do PR for that company” story, American Apparel made headlines for the big, fat settlement it awarded to a former employee who claimed his boss at the troubled clothing company called him the N-word. The man walked away with $345K — and American Apparel walked away with its tail between its legs. This is a listmaker to remind us our brand has to have integrity at all times or it will pay the price.

4.) Team Loyalty Goes Extreme: BandSports came up with the ultimate way for soccer lovers to express themselves: a parental control plug-in that blocks every team but your favorite. It’s a buzzworthy product complete with a snappy video explaining how it works.

5.) The Return of Big Red: If you’ve never had a Big Red soda, you’re missing out. The soft drink, which features a taste that falls somewhere between hummingbird feeder liquid and Mountain Dew dyed the color of cherry Kool-Aid, has a major cult following. And it finally joined the digital revolution this month with its first advertisement in 25 years! While the commercial is corny and perhaps wasn’t worth the wait, we applaud the brand for showing up to the viral party.

Oversharing is *not* Caring

Follow Us

  • RSS Feed
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google+

Let’s be honest here: Who doesn’t love a good social media overshare? Sure, it’s a little uncomfortable to watch a Facebook friend go ape over politics, blather on about the boil they found on their knee or openly trash their boss. But it’s compelling stuff for a minute, anyway. It’s like the loud drunk guy at a party who’s more trashed than everyone else and stops the room’s conversation so he can yell at people he barely knows.

Part of what makes social media oversharing so ridiculous is that everybody knows how tacky it is to give out too much information on Facebook or Twitter. So when someone actually melts down online, you can’t take your eyes off of it. Yet this got us wondering: Maybe we should have a refresher on why oversharing on social media is dangerous for your image, bad for your brand and just plain rude.

The UK Ministry of Defense agrees. Mashable ran a piece earlier this week about how the ministry is cautioning its servicemen and women about the dangers of oversharing on social media. The online PSAs point out that carelessness on social media could actually be extremely dangerous for members of the armed forces. It’s a great campaign — we’ll go a step further. We think oversharing is disastrous for brands and individuals. Images can be made or destroyed overnight; with long-winded or inappropriate social media messages, it can happen a lot faster than that.

Anthony Weiner would surely agree and so would nearly every other pop star or professional athlete. When tweeting or Facebooking for your business, stay away from politics, religion, sex, your company’s inner workings, gossip, race and anything else that followers would find offensive. And while we would like to assume you wouldn’t do such a thing, let us advise you never to send pictures of your junk in tweets or conduct raunchy conversations on Facebook.

Oversharing is not caring… mainly because it’s tacky. Bitching in all caps about your clients or ranting about coworkers just looks horrible. The social media overshare is like farting in an elevator. Just don’t do it.

Viva la Indifference

Follow Us

  • RSS Feed
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google+

Oh, France. France is always the first in line to hate on something; then, in turn, the rest of us then hate on France for being so judgmental and so, well, French. Yet for every Jerry Lewis they love there is the occasional stroke of genius in their thinking (like their blunt distaste for George Bush and the Iraq war). So we wondered: Are the French right about social media?

Yesterday news blogs were abuzz with word that everybody’s favorite snooty country has now banned journalists from ending their news programs with a reference to their personal social networking sites. Moreover, unless Twitter or Facebook are actually making news, neither site will be mentioned on French television. Spokeswoman for the Conseil Superieur de l’Audiovisuel, France’s government broadcast authority, Christine Kelly told The Guardian “Why give preference to Facebook, which is worth billions of dollars, when there are other social networks that are struggling for recognition. This would be a distortion of competition. If we allow Facebook and Twitter to be cited on air, it’s opening a Pandora’s Box. Other social networks will complain to us, saying ‘Why not us?’”

Instead, French television reporters will now close their broadcasts by saying “retrouvez-nous sur les réseaux sociaux” or “find us on social networks.” This ban is considered to be the first of many in the socialist country’s attempt to control social media and the Internet. While the ban is distinctly French in its dismissive qualities, it does open a hotbed of questions about the relevance of journalists and self-promotion through social media. But surely such a ban won’t change the rest of the planet’s obsession with melting social media and news together in one gooey and complicated information sandwich, right? By constantly pimping Facebook and Twitter on television, does that crush our usage of other social networks?

Either way you slice it, our questions regarding the boundaries of social media and journalism are just beginning to deepen and expand. But let’s hear from you Brandsplatters. Is France right about this one? Let us know in the comments section below!

Five Things You Might Have Missed

Follow Us

  • RSS Feed
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google+

In a sleepy spring news week with nary a peep of drama from the usual suspects, social media, tech and marketing news has been scarce. Yet we put our digging super powers to work and found 5 things you might have missed!

  1. The Branded Mini Movie: If you’ve missed the avalanche of short movies pushed out by brands like BMW, Royal Caribbean and Denny’s lately, you might be the only one. Yet Internet short films top our list because of the surprising resurgence and the even more surprising viewer response. A dramatic infomercial film for The Better Sleep Council starring Shannen Doherty scored big YouTube views and ignited the blogs back in January. Branded mini movies may not be new, but 2011 is likely to be known as the year the genre exploded.
  2. J. Crew Gets Edgy: Okay, not really (and just typing those words made us laugh). I mean, J. Crew thinks vanilla is spicy. Nonetheless, the company stirred up an unwanted controversy when it featured creative director Jenna Lyons and her 5-year-old son after a toenail painting session. People with nothing better to do have erupted and called the ad all sorts of ridiculous things. This non-scandal is as stupid as they come but it makes our list because for the first time since the Clintons left the White House, people are actually buzzing about J. Crew.
  3. If You Can’t Say Anything Nice… This U.S. Air Force flowchart, courtesy of Social Media Penguin, is a clear reminder of how to respond to negative comments about our products or business online. In short, the military, along with Ghandi and your mom, still believes silence is the strongest action you can take when dealing with haters and their comments.
  4. The Just Because Blog: We’ve noticed industry-related blogs and company blogs taking a moment during the week to just blow off steam and post something odd, silly or just plain fun. And you know what? We love it! The Just Because blog provides followers a break from the barrage of news and chatter they get in their newsfeeds all day long. Yes, we want people to follow our ultra-serious and important blog… but we also want our readers to stick around and the Just Because blog is a nice way to encourage that.
  5. Not Every Joke is a Hit: Personally, we had a good laugh when we saw the pictures of a billboard promoting AMC’s zombie series The Walking Dead placed cleverly outside a funeral home. But some folks in the UK were not amused. The billboard has been removed and Clear Channel has apologized.