Don’t Miss an Opportunity: Understanding Facebook for Business

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Facebook for Business

Social media has taken a significant role in the marketing and operation of businesses in the digital age. This influence has been so profound that it has produced an entirely new type of marketing job in the form of a social media marketing specialist. Before hiring anyone to manage the social media for your company, it is important to have a basic understanding of the impact each social media community can have on your marketing efforts. In terms of Facebook for business, the key is to engage customers so that you remain at “top of mind” when the time comes to use your service.

Facebook is more about Branding and Customer Retention, Not Acquisition

It is important to understand when establishing a Facebook presence what your goals are. As any experienced social media marketing specialist can explain, each outlet has different uses in the marketing world, and Facebook is no exception. Many times, people think that if they set up a Facebook account for their company they will magically start getting likes, and their brand will simply explode due to all of the extra exposure. This is unrealistic.

Though Facebook will occasionally lead a customer to your company, and can be quite effective in that regard for certain industries, the simple fact is that the platform is not intended for businesses.  However, Facebook can work as a great tool to keep your business on your customers’ radar. By regularly posting updates, your product or service can stay fresh in peoples’ minds.

Your Only Expense is Time

Though there is the option to purchase Facebook ads, which can be very effective, the cornerstone of a successful Facebook marketing strategy does not require any paid advertising. The real keys to success are simple: keep a consistent voice and remain true to your brand, regularly make posts, and engage with customers. If your business is small, you may even be able to devote enough time each day to do this yourself.  If you can afford it, you can hire a company to monitor your account and keep your content fresh.

Ultimately, the key to success on Facebook is the same as any other marketing program. You need your message to stay in front of customers, and let them know that your value. By establishing this connection, you can help ensure that your business comes to mind when they need your service.

Everybody Takes a Facebook Break

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It’s happened to everybody who does Facebook management for their company. After months of engagement and lively chatter back and forth, suddenly — zip, nada, silence. Suddenly those talkative types in your thread have shut their traps and your posts go ignored. Posting the wrong kind of stuff is usually what makes user engagement sink, but there might be another factor, too. A new study says at one time or another, most Facebook users log off and take a break.

According to the PEW Internet and American Life Project, the majority of Facebook account holders have been known to go months without commenting on a picture, liking a branded page or (gasp!) even playing a round of Candy Crush. This new survey released Tuesday found that 61 percent of Facebook users have at some point “taken a break” from the planet’s most popular social network.

“Pew reached 1,006 adults in the continental U.S. by phone during three days in December. Some 860 of them use the Internet, and 525 use Facebook,” writes Mashable.com.

The 525 who use Facebook were then asked if they had ever “voluntarily taken a break from using Facebook for a period of several weeks or more” during any point of being a member of the site, leading to that 61 percent affirmative statistic.

The main reason people take Facebook sabbaticals? They have lives. Twenty-one percent say their breaks were brought on by becoming too busy and no longer having time for the site. Ten percent said they lost interest, while another 10 percent said they found it to be a waste of time. Another not-so-shocking 9 percent said they took a break because of negativity and drama. According to the survey, some adults have taken a break and never returned to Facebook.

“One in five online adults (20 percent) say that they used Facebook in the past but no longer do so,” PEW writes.

This group of anti-Facebookers cites gossip, compromised accounts and privacy issues among the reasons they left and didn’t come back.

For regular account holders, Facebook breaks seem like a healthy thing to do and may even be good for perspective. For Facebook marketing experts, these kind of breaks should be a call to create less spam and more dynamic content. But what do you, our brilliant readers, think about this topic? Have you ever taken a Facebook break? Did you take that break and never return? We wanna know! Tell us in the comments section below!

Your Blog Still ‘Likes’ Facebook

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Maybe teens are too cool for it. Perhaps some brands have turned up their noses. But the truth is this: Facebook is still a really powerful tool. The platform is ever-evolving. Campaigns are now formulated and carried out differently than they once were back when Facebook was the golden child of social media marketing. But one thing remains the same: Facebook for business is fantastic for blog marketing.

The disconnect between Facebook and your blog can be easy to miss. If both channels are busy, they may never intersect, which is too bad since your blog is the kind of thing perfect for Facebook posts. Facebookers like brands with unique content and blogs are an easy way to deliver precisely that. If, however, neither channel is getting any action, linking the two is an even better way to give both your Facebook page and your blog a shot in the arm.

This all sounds very easy, yet you would be astonished at the brands that don’t post links to their blogs on Facebook. It’s as if they don’t see how easy making them work together truly is. Southwest Airlines, a company we routinely applaud in these pages for amazing online marketing prowess, is great at posting YouTube clips from its channel and interesting posts from its renowned blog on Facebook. The company clearly sees the value of creating a digital marketing presence.

The best part of Facebooking a blog post is that it is ridiculously easy. How easy? I clocked less than 30 seconds to link a new post to a client’s Like page earlier today. New posts are ideal, but there’s no law saying you can’t put an “oldie but goodie” blog post on your page — especially if it was one that didn’t get much play the first go ’round.

Oh, but the easy, breezy marriage of Facebook and blogging does not end there, folks. You can in mere moments put a Facebook widget on your blog’s page to get readers to become fans.

If your blog and Facebook page are not linked together, please, man! Go do it! Now. After all, even though many may be “over” or “too cool” for Facebook, sticking your blog in front of 2 billion people is kind of a no-brainer.

Facebook is Going to Find Out What You Really ‘Want’

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Facebook marketing in 2012 is a never-ending roller coaster. Some days, the world comes to your page; other days, all of your efforts sit there and collect dust. As a social media channel, Facebook has had one hell of a challenging year and the brand continues to search for ways to pull itself out of the hole and pull in revenue. Over the last several days, we’ve watched Facebook inch closer to online shopping and retail solutions. Last week we saw Facebook roll out Facebook Gifts, a Facebook-based shopping service which allows users to buy presents for friends celebrating birthdays. On Tuesday, however, the online marketing world was buzzing about the “Want” button. Here’s what we know about this new Facebook feature and what it could mean for marketers.

According to the Los Angeles Times, a “Want” button is currently being tested by Facebook. “Want” would be the equivalent of “Like” but for retail items like shoes, clothes and cosmetics. Facebook users would build wish lists, officially referred to in Facebookland as “Collections,” which would feature the items they’ve stamped with the “Want” button.

“People will be able to engage with these collections and share things they are interested in with their friends. People can click through and buy these items off of Facebook,” Facebook said in a statement, according to Reuters.

Select Facebook users will soon see the “Want” button as well as a section marked Collections during testing. Seven retailers have hopped on board during the testing — Victoria’s Secret, Pottery Barn, Neiman Marcus, Michael Kors, Smith Optics, Wayfair and Fab.com, respectively. Facebook appears to be very serious about getting the kinks ironed out and getting these features to its billion-plus users as soon as possible.

The retail makeover of Facebook seems like a natural progression. Social shopping as been stuck in the mud for a few years and most efforts have been unmitigated disasters. Perhaps it’s an idea whose time has come. For marketers and Internet-based retailers, the “Want” prospect could be an exciting one if all goes well. If Facebook offers this feature for all brands, this could mean a huge boom for smaller businesses that struggle with getting products noticed. It has a social Etsy-type of potential if Facebook looks beyond the big mall retailers.

Enlighten us, lovely readers: Is a “Want” button a good idea or just another nail in Facebook’s coffin? Tell us your thoughts in the comments section!

Yay or Nay on the New Facebook Privacy Settings?

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Facebook is really starting to feel like that nosey relative who stays too long at family get-togethers and asks way too many personal questions. At first, the bombs dropped about how the social media giant was giving away your private information to whomever logged on – including the FBI and other federal agencies – appeared to be a cross over into scary Big Brother type territory. This publicized panic didn’t really discourage anybody from using Facebook, however. Facebook masterminds in suits claimed that the site wasn’t in the business of handing out the more

The Chicken Chronicles, Volume 2

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Last month in this very blog, we covered the culinary Godzilla that is KFC’s Double Down. The marketing and buzz for the heart-clogging delight was unlike anything we’ve ever seen. Not to be outdone, everybody’s favorite closed-on-Sunday chicken hut, Chik-Fil-A, has launched an online, full-tilt boogie campaign for its new spicy chicken sandwich.

For being widely considered an old-fashioned, good-family-values kind of fast food chain, Chik-Fil-A knows how to rock online marketing, social media and positive word of mouth. Chik-Fil-A tweets regularly about more