Facebook Page Assault: When Apple Fans Attack

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Trekkies, Bronies and Claymates are quiet little kittens compared to Macheads. For a company that makes computers, phones and tablets, Apple sure does inspire a crazed groupie type of response. Members of The Church of Apple are one devoted bunch of computer-loving folks… and lord help the company that tries to slam Apple with Facebook marketing. Samsung took (yet) another cheap shot at Apple on its Facebook page this week and learned the hard way that hell hath no fury like a Machead scorned.

The most recent round of brand bitchery was launched by Samsung when it posted an ad for its Galaxy 3 smartphone on its Facebook page. According to the company, Galaxy 3 is the phone most people would want to be stranded on a desert island with. The spot was a slam-dunk for Facebook marketing engagement almost immediately. Posted on September 6, the video has over 45,000 likes and 15,000 comments. Yet according to the Huffington Post, much of the so-called Facebook love for Samsung is actually pretty ugly. Macheads used the post as an opportunity to sing the praises of the new iPhone 5, a chance to bash the results of the recent Samsung lawsuit and as a platform to mock Samsung users. Others skewered the commercial itself, saying they’d pass on having that smartphone in favor of a toothbrush or a satellite phone to call for rescue.

Given its worldwide sales, I’m sure Samsung cares very little if Apple trolls attack its Facebook ads. And that’s the right response for any size company. Haters, as the saying goes, are gonna hate and there is very little you can do about it. Getting upset or defending a campaign is a waste of marketing time.  It’s best to politely acknowledge the opinions of critics and move on. Facebook for business is a fickle game and there is no pleasing all your followers all of the time.

But you tell us, readers: Have you ever verbally spanked a brand’s Facebook page? And do you delete negative responses from your company’s Facebook page? And finally, just to keep things spicy, which brand do you like more — Apple or Samsung? Let the games begin in the comment section below!

 

Five Things You Might Have Missed

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Sorry, Florence. The dogs days of summer are far from over. But hopefully our weekly, breezy roundup of online marketing news will refresh you!

1.) The Babymaker: Topping the list this week is this viral video from Singapore for Mentos. National Night, which happens on August 9th, encourages citizens of the small country to do their part to help the country’s low birthrate. So desperate for a new generation, the government in Singapore is even giving away financial incentives to new parents! Mentos is pitching in with this funny, cheesy R&B music video. Head scratching, hilarious and wildly straightforward, this is viral marketing on a totally different level.

2.) Fake Friends: This week, people couldn’t stop talking about people who don’t exist. A new study from the struggling social media giant claims that 83 million Facebook accounts are fake. While social media marketing gurus see the millions of phonies as a big red flag, Facebook is not taking the numbers lightly. The company issued a warning that b.s. Facebook accounts will be disabled and the creators of those accounts won’t be allowed back on the site.

3.) Hot or Just a Hot Mess: We haven’t had a good controversial blogger story in some time, so if you missed WSJ’s piece on Cat Marnell, we’ve got it for you. Marnell is a former beauty blogger turned blogger for Vice Magazine who now writes about her adventures as a drug addict. Marnell claims to be on the way to taking the literary world by storm while others say she’s a cheap imitation of a New York party girl. Whatever Marnell’s real story is, blog writing has never been a more powerful platform for launching talked-about personalities as it is right now.

4.) Corporate Cattiness: While all of these rivalries at the Olympics are keeping the masses riveted, most of us missed the serious smack down brewing between Samsung and Apple in a major lawsuit revolving around patent issues. Apple says Samsung directly ripped off ideas and technologies behind its hit products like the iPhone and iPad. Samsung denies the accusations — and bloggers are eating up the daily courtroom happenings with a spoon. Only time will tell what the financial fallout will be from this branding battle royale, but for now, it’s the best legal drama we’ve seen since LA Law.

5.) Tag, You’re It: Closing out our list this week is an awesome game from Expedia Australia and New Zealand. Tag Me if You Can sends famed Aussie surfer Nathan Jolliffe around the globe while followers try to guess where he is and correctly tag the travel videos. Players get more points if they share the game with Twitter and Facebook followers.

Nobody Puts Facebook in the Corner

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What with all of this Google, Apple and Twitter news this week it seems like it has been an eternity since we’ve heard a peep out of the bombastic yet reliable Facebook publicity machine. Well, fear not. I was able to dig up the latest in Facebook dirt in the suddenly neglected (yeah right!) social media superstar’s life.

For starters, this spiffy, little study showed that Facebook as well as Twitter both experienced a big bump last year in use on more

Swallowing apple’s tablet for mobile marketing

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ipad

Yesterday’s unveiling of Apple’s new Ipad unleashed a plethora of speculation, criticism, bad PMS jokes, and wagging tongues. The Ipad, just in case you’ve been living under a rock, is Mac’s 1.5 ounce portable mini-computer that combines the companies previous products the Iphone and the Itouch to become a tech-fanatic’s Star Trek fantasy brought to life.  Apple enthusiasts are clamoring to get their  little hands on the Ipad, while Mac haters are praying that this latest product will fall flat on its flat little face. Whatever your stance on the Ipad is, it can’t be denied that Mac has… more

YouTube steps into the television pay-per-view ring.

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boxing_kangaroos

Sites like Hulu have been offering free streaming video of your favorite TV shows for a while now, so it’s no wonder that YouTube is getting into the act. But unlike Hulu, YouTube intends to charge for the service. According to Peter Kafka YouTube will be offering

something similar to what Apple and Amazon already offer: First-run shows, without commercials, for $1.99 an episode, available the day after they air on broadcast or cable.

The big difference with the YouTube model is that your favorite episodes will stream to your computer instead of downloading (Apple and Amazon let you download). Negotiating with the networks are still in the works. But what network wouldn’t love to charge for a streamed version of their shows instead of the Hulu model, where shows are readily available for free? One thing is certain, the Hulu free-for-all model is about to get a little fire under it’s digital ass.

Incredible, Amazing, Awesome Apple gives lesson in SEO copywriting via spliced video.

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amazing_apple

Whether Apple knows it or not, they have just demonstrated how to script powerful SEO copywriting that can be both effective and entertaining. It comes in the form of a recent spliced up video of extracts taken from Apple’s Keynote address in September 2009 (below).

You have to wonder if the people at Apple have a keyword strategy for their keynote addresses that mimics what you’d expect to see in SEO copywriting. What is SEO copywriting? SEO copywriting is the art (some would say science) of crafting compelling copy on a web page that strives for keyword density which can be used as a factor in determining whether that web page is relevant to a specified keyword or keyword phrase. Obviously keyword density is helpful to have so that when web crawlers visit the page, your keywords will be indexed and ranked higher for those searched terms. This means you can organically grow your ranking for certain search terms if you have the right keyword density.  In the case of the Apple keynote address, the keywords/keyword strategy would include implementing the following words into the copy: great, incredible, amazing, beautiful, awesome, easy, nice, cool and wonderful. When you watch the full version of the Apple keynote, the above listed keywords are not so evident and even add a flare of enthusiasm to the presentation. When I saw the original video, I didn’t notice the overuse of any one of the words until the spliced video pointed it out in a humorous way. Considering the spliced video is inching toward half a million views in just three days, perhaps others will see it more clearly too.

I thought it would be interesting to go back to the originanl un-spliced version and see just how many times each word was used. Here is a breakdown:

Great (54)

Incredible (26)

Easy (18)

Amazing (17)

Cool (12)

Beautiful (7)

Nice (6)

Awesome (5)

Wonderful (5)

I don’t really know if the Apple presentation was intentionally scripted with these keywords in mind or not. That’s not the point. The point is this is a nice illustration of how you can write compelling content with a handful of words as long as you implement the words naturally, and keep in mind that what you’re writing about must capture the attention of your audience. Hats off to the people at Apple for giving us a great, incredible, amazing, awesome, nice and wonderful things to think about. Cool.