Boone Oakley; you’re so three thousand and eight.

Follow Us

  • RSS Feed
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google+

booneoakley

Check out this cool website for Charlotte, N.C. based advertising agency Boone Oakley. Their site is part viral marketing and part website as it is built entirely on a Youtube platform. I thought SEO copywriting was the latest way to conduct online brand marketing. Apparently the next wave is Youtube channel sites. Granted, the navigation involves sliding the timeline bar and clicking on hotspots so it is a bit clunky, you still have to give the team at Boone Oakley props for taking an innovative approach to online brand marketing. When doing a search for the agency on Google, I also notice they have a social marketing strategy by having a feed on twitter, and a linkedIn page . Using Youtube is a fresh approach to branding your company online and I hope to see more of it at this level of high concept.

Bing clawing away at Yahoo market share

Follow Us

  • RSS Feed
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google+

bing_yahoo

When Bing came on the scene, I posted an entry suggesting that Bing was capitalizing on weaknesses of how users interact with Google’s search technology. Recent data, however, suggests that Bing may be eating into Yahoo’s market share instead. The numbers show that Bing gained.04 percent in market share while Yahoo lost .05 percent and Google held steady, neither gaining nor losing. The indication here is that Bing is giving Yahoo some heated competition. Can this mean that Yahoo may be ready to come to the table and make a deal with Microsoft? According to the rumor mill at blorge.com “An entourage of high-ranking Micrsofties have reportedly been seen strutting around Yahoo’s Sunnyvale Headquarters” .  I’ll believe it when I see it. Being a Yahoo shareholder myself, I can’t tell you how many times rumors of deal making between the two tech giants has affected stock prices and the hopes and dreams of shareholders like me. But the numbers don’t lie. Bing is experiencing an increase in web traffic and Yahoo is lagging. Sounds like deal making time to me.

The revolution will be televised. And supported by really cool online ads.

Follow Us

  • RSS Feed
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google+

thurs_6_25

All the data in the world can’t tell you if an ad campaign is responsible for increased sales. The success or failure of any sales effort involves so many factors. It would be impossible to credit or blame an advertising campaign on the data collected. In the fast-paced world of Internet marketing, it is possible to get far more analytic data than we once had to track the results of any online campaign effort. And clients and agencies alike seem to be relying more and more on the numbers and less and less on whether or not it is a good ad. Just because we have more data doesn’t mean we know any more than we did ten years ago. I once heard a creative director at a very large advertising agency tell a very large client that advertising doesn’t make people go out and buy products. The client was dismayed and asked why he was advertising with the agency then. He replied, “The only thing you can hope for is that someone will like you a little more because you just made them laugh or cry.” That’s it! I tend to agree. Any client who thinks a piece of communication is going to get people to remove their rotund arse from a warm comfortable seat and head over to a store with cash in hand is fooling themselves. So why do we have a confluence of analytic tools and measuring methods that are all tethered to sales results? In a recent Adage article, Hernan Lopez, president of Fox Networks and chief operating officer of Fox International Channels said, “the most important factor behind successful TV campaigns was the quality of the creative” .  You go Hernan! He goes on to say that “the industry’s obsession with click-through rates, despite evidence of their small correlation with total sales, results in messages that are rarely entertaining or amusing and are overly reliant on verbal hard sell.” Mr. Lopez believes the answer relies on a creative revolution. As a former creative, I couldn’t agree more. But don’t expect me to move my arse any time soon.

Branded content. It’s a jungle.

Follow Us

  • RSS Feed
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google+

tues_6_231

In 2001, advertising agency BBDO launched a series of online mini-movies called “The Hire” . The films showcased the latest BMW cars and were viewed over 11 million times in four months. The Hire caused a flurry of interest in branded content and the production of branded entertainment. Fast-forward to 2009, where marketers are doing an about-face and clinging on to the traditional forms of advertising because they know exactly what they are getting with a TV buy. In hard times, tried-and-true measures trump taking a risk on the untamed world of the Internet. YouTube spawned numerous viral videos for big brands that were seen by millions. But, who was watching? And did it move the needle for sales? Being able to target and track audiences online is like herding wild water buffalo. According to a recent Adweek article, “an oversupply of content for what is now a trickle of advertising dollars, the recession, a lack of metrics and a fragmented market” means that branded content has taken a back seat for most marketers. But branded content isn”™t a new idea. Remember “Mutual of Omaha”™s Wild Kingdom” ? Mutual of Omaha was a good example of how a brand could create content that had nothing to do what they were known for; insurance. But it worked. And perhaps, if the stars align just right, it will work again.